Mobility research in bed: bock presents initial results of its ripolux neo surveillance study

Care researcher Dr Nils Lahmann is a staff scientist at the Charité university hospital in Berlin and is providing scientific support for the surveillance study on the effects of lying surfaces.
Care researcher Dr Nils Lahmann is a staff scientist at the Charité university hospital in Berlin and is providing scientific support for the surveillance study on the effects of lying surfaces.
The initial results of an ongoing surveillance study suggest that residents in beds with lying surfaces that utilise an individual-spring system, such as ripolux neo®, have more peaceful and restorative sleep.
The initial results of an ongoing surveillance study suggest that residents in beds with lying surfaces that utilise an individual-spring system, such as ripolux neo®, have more peaceful and restorative sleep.

Hermann Bock GmbH is currently conducting a scientific surveillance study to explore the relationship between sleep quality and the mobility of nursing care bed users. The study is being carried out under the scientific supervision of nursing care specialist and epidemiologist Dr Nils Lahmann, who will present his initial results on 8 and 9 March 2016 at the Altenpflege 2016 geriatric care trade fair. The aim of the research project is to determine whether nursing care beds offer benefits in terms of mobility, and if so, what those advantages are. It involves comparing ripolux neo® lying surfaces, which utilise an individual-spring system, with traditional lying surfaces

Improved mobility

“The first results show that the individual-spring system helps to considerably reduce the number of macro-movements in the night.” Dr Nils Lahmann observes “that residents in beds fitted with ripolux neo® have more peaceful and restorative sleep. This corresponds with the answers given to the accompanying survey.” In addition, there is an improvement in residents’ mobility. This mobility-supporting effect is particularly important when it comes to care, as mobility is a key factor for many other aspects of health. However, the care researcher is not jumping to conclusions. “There is a very clear positive tendency, but the study is still ongoing. To draw reliable conclusions, we have to wait until all of the results are available.”

The ripolux neo® surveillance study is currently being carried out at nursing care facilities across Germany. Sensors in the bed analyse a wide range of sleep and position parameters. The data collected in this way is linked to participant questionnaires so as to compare subjective results such as “restorative quality of sleep” to objective measurement data.

Advantages for participating nursing care facilities

The ripolux neo® study was initiated by Hermann Bock GmbH as a post-market clinical follow-up. Managing Director Dr Stefan Kettelhoit explains that his company places a high value on independence where the study is concerned: “We need reliable data that lives up to scientific standards rather than biased research, because the results are intended to help us improve beds for nursing care.”

At the Altenpflege 2016 trade fair, the Ravensberger Stift care home will also describe their experiences, as will the Diakonis care home in Detmold. Both organisations are participating in the research. The study is having a positive spin-off effect, in that the sensor data is leading to adjustments in the medication being given to some residents, according to Carola Hilker, nursing care director at Diakonis. The positive feedback has prompted Hermann Bock GmbH to expand the study once again so as to include more care facilities. More information is available by writing to infoNOSPAM@bock.net.

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