Mobility research in bed – Hermann Bock has lying surfaces scientifically tested

A scientific observational study will show whether ergonomic lying surfaces such as the individual-spring system ripolux neo® can improve the mobility of users.
A scientific observational study will show whether ergonomic lying surfaces such as the individual-spring system ripolux neo® can improve the mobility of users.
For ideal relief from pressure points, the ripolux neo® lying surface – consisting of springs with three different levels of stiffness – can be individually configured without the use of tools.
For ideal relief from pressure points, the ripolux neo® lying surface – consisting of springs with three different levels of stiffness – can be individually configured without the use of tools.
Healthcare expert Dr Nils Lahmann from Charité Berlin will provide scientific support for the study on the effects of lying surfaces.
Healthcare expert Dr Nils Lahmann from Charité Berlin will provide scientific support for the study on the effects of lying surfaces.

Sleep quality and mobility of nursing care bed users are the focal points of a new surveillance study announced by bed manufacturer Hermann Bock GmbH at the medical technology trade fair Medica (Düsseldorf, Germany, 16 to 19 November 2015). The study will determine the effect that various lying surfaces have on sleep parameters such as comfort, pain perception and restorative quality of sleep. To do this, conventional lying surfaces will be compared to the ripolux neo® lying surface system, which consists of more than 100 individual springs and provides ergonomic relief from pressure points. The movement-supporting effect of the different lying surfaces used is of particular importance for care facilities, according to healthcare expert Dr Nils Lahmann from the Charité Berlin, who is providing scientific support to the study: “Maintaining and increasing mobility in care has to be given more attention, because other studies indicate that mobility is a key factor in many other health conditions.”

A scientific test of “as you make your bed, so you must lie in it”

The surveillance study, which in technical terms is called a post-market clinical follow-up (PMCF), is being commissioned by Hermann Bock GmbH. “We want to add some extra authority to the saying ‘as you make your bed, so you must lie in it’ – in the form of scientific data,” Dr Stefan Kettelhoit, managing director of Hermann Bock GmbH, explains. The company is setting great store by independence. “We need hard data acquired according to scientific standards, not some soft study in our favour,” Kettelhoit emphasises, “because the results should help us to make our beds even better for care.”

Surveillance study at six study centres in Germany

In particular, the research project is intended to shed some light on the extent to which movement-supporting effects of care beds can promote the mobility of residents. To collect hard data, the study will be conducted in the form of post-market surveillance (PMS) at six care facilities in Germany, with over 100 participants. Sensors in the beds will collect various data points on certain sleep and lying parameters. The data collected in this manner will be combined with surveys of the participants to compare subjective results such as “restorative quality of the sleep” with objectivly measured data. The initial results of the study should be available in summer of 2016.

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